Some time ago I read some news that made me think a lot about business models. Modern services are most of the time a non-sense business model; the vast majority is either free, or ads supported, or subscription-based. All of these models are not OK for most of the cases.

A note before starting: this is a very opinionated post that I wrote some time ago for my personal blog. I’m publishing this again because things have not improved at all; to the contrary, they are getting worse and worse.


Start with the right foot and don’t waste time

When starting a new project it is important to set things right from the beginning, so that you will not waste time later and will not be forced into something that is not the right direction. Here’s my personal list of thins I do and I don’t (mostly based on AWS because that’s what I know more, but any cloud provider is fine).


or: how managers should learn to stop worrying and love those pets

We are not there yet, but my co-founder and I agree that if we ever get to the point of having employees in Saasform, not only we have nothing against having pet projects, but we’d encourage them. As developers we are naturally pushed towards regularly have side projects; it shows curiosity for the world around us.

I really think that side projects bring a lot of value to companies. Employees feel freer. There are times when, as an employee, you might lose interest in what your company does. It’s normal; your company goals might not align with your personal development…


Too many times, we read endless posts that are not concise enough. People are busy these days, and they are smart enough to get the concept the first time you tell them.

If you want to emphasise the message, you can say it twice. You can add an example or two, maybe a link, but then that’s enough; there’s no use in writing long posts that says little.

If you have little to say, write little. If you have nothing, write nothing. In the information-overload era, it’s unnecessary to add stuff over stuff, especially when this stuff says nothing. Of course, you could say the same about this post, but at least it’s short.


Make your product as easy as possible to integrate

While I was doing my Ph.D. my research group was working on an obscure technology; I remember only a few people all over the world were into this technology and it was quite hard and difficult to use; it required special hardware, and the tools and development libraries available were very rough. One day, we decided to develop some software using that technology; the software was quite straightforward, but it required to do a certain number of tasks on the Linux shell, to patch OpenSSL, and to do a few things at the same time on different shells, in a…


I’ve always thought of Basecamp as a quasi-indie company because of their approach to things (the rebuttal of the unicorn culture, the focus on quality of life, on what a company should be and so on), so it was weird to see the huge number of people that is leaving the company.

I’ve read this recap, which seems quite clear (maybe a little bit biased, but not that much IMO); I‘ve always felt that discussing politics and society in general, as well as books, music and culture, is a good thing in order to breath fresh life every now and then.

Maybe I’m biased, but Basecamp is not the company I would have bet would have put this kind of policy.

Do you have any opinion?


Today I was thinking about the concept of acceptable evil. An acceptable evil is something that is far from being ideal but considering all the alternatives and the context is acceptable. For example, for me Apple is an acceptable evil; note the for me part, for others, they are pure evil or pure perfection.

They do a lot of bad stuff, but given the context, for me, they are an acceptable evil. I’ll explain. I don’t like the way they are covered with secrecy, nor I don’t like that they do so much closed source. And for sure I hate


I bet you heard that authentication is hard somewhere. It is a well-known subject, and many people write about it. But it’s worth saying that once more: it’s 2021 and authentication is still hard. It actually got even harder: with every new technology, with every new service, with every new attack, authentication becomes harder and harder.

Image released with (CC BY-SA 4.0)

And not only it’s hard, it’s also vast. Many tend to forget this point; when you are building software and you think about authentication, you usually think of login and registration. But there’s much more. Signup and sign-in are just the tip of the…


How a joke made the home page on hacker news

A few days ago my boss told me that he was about to publish a job post where he was looking for a lazy developer. It might seem counterintuitive, but laziness is a quality for a developer. Or at least, it is according to some people. Laziness in the sense that a lazy programmer will always try to find the smart way of solving problems instead of the brute force that requires tens of lines of code.

As we are friends I decided to mock him a little and quickly translated the job post to English, bought a domain for…

Davide Vernizzi

Fullstack dev with 15 years of experience. Now working on saasform.dev an open source authentication framework. Prior I earned a Ph.D in computer security

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store